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Cryptocurrency Trading

Cryptocurrency Trading
The cryptocurrency market is considered illiquid and s mall trades can have huge impact on market prices.

Cryptocurrency trading involves speculating on price movements via a CFD trading account, or buying and selling the underlying coins via an exchange. Here you’ll find more information about cryptocurrency trading, how it works and what moves the markets.

We are able to operate in this market with reliable profit and risk management

CFD trading on cryptocurrencies

  • CFDs trading are derivatives, which enable you to speculate on cryptocurrency price movements without taking ownership of the underlying coins. You can go long (‘buy’) if you think a cryptocurrency will rise in value, or short (‘sell’) if you think it will fall.

Both are leveraged products, meaning you only need to put up a small deposit – known as margin – to gain full exposure to the underlying market. Your profit or loss are still calculated according to the full size of your position, so leverage will magnify both profits and losses.

Buying and selling cryptocurrencies via an exchange

  • When you buy cryptocurrencies via an exchange, you purchase the coins themselves. You’ll need to create an exchange account, put up the full value of the asset to open a position, and store the cryptocurrency tokens in your own wallet until you’re ready to sell.

Exchanges bring their own steep learning curve as you’ll need to get to grips with the technology involved and learn how to make sense of the data. Many exchanges also have limits on how much you can deposit, while accounts can be very expensive to maintain.

Cryptocurrency markets are decentralised, which means they are not issued or backed by a central authority such as a government. Instead, they run across a network of computers. However, cryptocurrencies can be bought and sold via exchanges and stored in ‘wallets’ .

Unlike traditional currencies, cryptocurrencies exist only as a shared digital record of ownership, stored on a blockchain. When a user wants to send cryptocurrency units to another user, they send it to that user’s digital wallet. The transaction isn’t considered final until it has been verified and added to the blockchain through a process called mining. This is also how new cryptocurrency tokens are usually created.

What is blockchain?

A blockchain is a shared digital register of recorded data. For cryptocurrencies, this is the transaction history for every unit of the cryptocurrency, which shows how ownership has changed over time. Blockchain works by recording transactions in ‘blocks’, with new blocks added at the front of the chain.

Blockchain technology has unique security features that normal computer files do not have.

Network consensus

  • A blockchain file is always stored on multiple computers across a network – rather than in a single location – and is usually readable by everyone within the network. This makes it both transparent and very difficult to alter, with no one weak point vulnerable to hacks, or human or software error.

Cryptography

  • Blocks are linked together by cryptography – complex mathematics and computer science. Any attempt to alter data disrupts the cryptographic links between blocks, and can quickly be identified as fraudulent by computers in the network.

What moves cryptocurrency markets?

Cryptocurrency markets move according to supply and demand. However, as they are decentralised, they tend to remain free from many of the economic and political concerns that affect traditional currencies. While there is still a lot of uncertainty surrounding cryptocurrencies, the following factors can have a significant impact on their prices:

  • Supply: the total number of coins and the rate at which they are released, destroyed or lost
  • Market capitalisation: the value of all the coins in existence and how users perceive this to be developing
  • Press: the way the cryptocurrency is portrayed in the media and how much coverage it is getting
  • Integration: the extent to which the cryptocurrency easily integrates into existing infrastructure such as e-commerce payment systems
  • Key events: major events such as regulatory updates, security breaches and economic setbacks

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